Kidney transplant patients are testing the booster dose of COVID-19 in a new experiment

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Effects are provided by national health institutions at a dose of 200 renal transplant patients who did not have an immune response to COVID-19 a new experiment which started yesterday.

Many transplant patients who need to take immunosuppressive drugs to prevent their bodies from rejecting a new organ do not produce enough antibodies — or do not produce antibodies at all — after receiving COVID-19. The study checks whether the third shot of mRNA vaccine given on top of a normal two-shot treatment program is closer to the levels of antibodies observed in healthy people.

There are indications that the third dose may help some people. In France, health authorities began recommending in April that immunocompromised patients receive a third sample of COVID-19. Half of the patients who did not respond to the two shots produced antibodies after the third analysis 159 kidney transplant patients. However, the other half did not yet have an answer. In Germany, one study Of the 48 transplant patients, 40% who did not respond to the two doses had a response after the third.

Two other studies looking at kidney transplant patients are also about to begin Israel and Switzerland.

It is possible that the current study may be sufficient for the U.S. health authorities to recommend that immunocompromised patients receive a third shot. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Vaccination Practices will address the issue at its meeting on Friday.

COVID-19 vaccines are currently available under an emergency license in the United States, which determines two doses for Pfizer / BioNTech and Moderna samples. In order for the third shot to become standard for any group, one of two things must happen: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must amend this authorization to include an alternative to a new shot, or the agency must approve vaccines in full. Once approved, physicians can prescribe a third dose in a practice called off-label use, which allows physicians to use drugs based on their evaluation, even if they are not technically purified for a specific purpose.

Some people in the United States are already touring the FDA and looking for a third shot. More than 900 people have received a third shot in the United States, according to data collected by the CDC, and that is likely to be an understatement.

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