The California legislature approves a historic broadband bill


The California legislature has voted unanimously to approve a $ 6 billion plan to build a nationwide open fiber network (h / t ArsTechnica). The state will provide $ 3.25 billion to hire a third party to build and maintain the so-called A “mid-mile” network that doesn’t bring the Internet directly from the backbone infrastructure to customers, but rather to access points, leaving last-mile ISPs. The legislation provides $ 2 billion for last-mile infrastructure lines to connect homes and businesses to local area networks.

Making the medium-distance network open allows for “non-discriminatory access to eligible entities on a technology and competition-neutral basis, regardless of whether the entity is privately or publicly owned”. The medium-mile plan prioritizes areas not provided by current Internet options; non-residential areas for 25 Mbps download speeds and 3 Mbps download speeds would be targeted first.

According to the plan, the California Public Benefit Commission (CPUC) “identifies priority state – wide open access medium – mile broadband network locations, including areas that can be built quickly, areas that do not have a known medium – mile network connection, areas that are provided by mid – range sub – services. areas that do not have sufficient capacity to meet the future needs of the medium mile, “according to the text of the law.

“Every Republican and Democrat in Sacramento voted only for fiber for the future,” Ernesto Falcon of the Electronic Frontier Foundation tweeted on Thursday.

Govin Newsom called the decline California historic. “This legislation gives vital, wider access to California families by prioritizing unserved and handicapped areas, facilities, households and businesses that remain disconnected in the digital age,” he said. opinion Monday. He is expected to sign the bill.

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